Quodlibet Lecture, March 21, featuring David Freidenreich [Colby College]

Quodlibet will sponsor the visit of David Freidenreich [Colby College], who will deliver a lecture on Monday, March 21 at 4:30pm in White Hall room 110: “”Food and Identity in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.”

Refusing to share a meal or accept food prepared by others does more than just express the notion that ‘We’ want nothing to do with ‘Them.’ This kind of anti-social behavior also reinforces ideas about who They are and, perhaps more importantly, who We are. Join us to explore the evolution of Jewish food laws and the ideas they convey about Jewishness. We’ll also examine the role food restrictions play in shaping Christian and Islamic identity, and we’ll consider the ways in which traditional ideas about Us and Them continue to shape interfaith relations today.”

David M. Freidenreich is the Pulver Family Associate Professor of Jewish Studies at Colby College, where he serves as director of the Jewish studies program and associate director of the Center for Small Town Jewish Life.  As a member of the religious studies department, he teaches a wide range of courses on Judaism, Jewish history, and comparative religion.  After receiving a B.A. from Brandeis University, he earned his Ph.D. at Columbia University and rabbinic ordination from the Jewish Theological Seminary. His award-winning first book, Foreigners and Their Food: Constructing Otherness in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic Law, explores attitudes toward adherents of foreign religions expressed in ancient and medieval laws about sharing food. He is currently studying the ways Christians have used ideas about Jews to think about Muslims.

[Also, from the Department of Near Eastern Studies:]

“Freidenreich will also be giving a lecture entitled ‘Christian Portrayals of Muhammad’s Jewish Associates’ on March 21st from 12:10-1:10pm in 410 White Hall. Lunch will be provided. If there is significant interest in this lecture, it may be necessary to change the room location to 110 White Hall. 410 is our lounge and we’ve got somewhat limited seating, perhaps enough for 25 people.”

If interested in this noontime lecture, please contact Ayla Cline at akc52@cornell.edu.

Ilya Dines visits Cornell

On Friday, March 11th, the Medieval Cosmologies Working Group will host a visit by Ilya Dines, Kluge Fellow at the Library of Congress, and a scholar of medieval Latin manuscripts who specializes in natural-scientific traditions, with a particular focus on bestiaries and cartography (nli.academia.edu/IlyaDines). His critical edition of the bestiaries of the “third family” is forthcoming from the University of Toronto Press, and his edition of and commentary on the Westminster Bestiary is forthcoming from Siloé. The visit will consist of a workshop and a seminar, both of which are open to all interested members of the community.

From 1:30-3:00, Kroch Library will host a workshop with relevant manuscripts and early printed works in Cornell’s collections.

From 4:30-6:30 in Goldwin Smith 156, Ilya Dines will lead a seminar on Huntington HM 38, a volume on geography, astronomy, medicine, and the apocalypse produced in the fifteenth-century in Lübeck. The manuscript contains a unique sequence of maps that illustrate “what will happen to the earth during the Last Days,” which are the topic of a new monograph by Chet van Duzer and Ilya Dines: Apocalyptic Cartography: Thematic Maps and the End of the World in a Fifteenth-Century Manuscript (Brill, 2016). Attendees may access an electronic copy of the monograph at this link – https://cornell.box.com/s/co2tmifnm34lgr785skwn2ioduwbf09r – please focus on chapters 1 and 5.

Ilya Dines’s visit has been supported by the Program in Medieval Studies and the Departments of English and the History of Art.

Brown Bag Lunch: Marilyn Migiel, “Reading Misogyny: Boccaccio ‘Against’ Women?”

Marilyn Migiel [Romance Studies] will discuss Giovanni Boccaccio (1313-1375) at noon next Wednesday, March 9, in Uris G24.

Migiel’s focus will be on work she has done and is currently doing on Boccaccio and the question of woman. She recently published published “Boccaccio and Women” in The Cambridge Companion to Boccaccio [2015]). At the lunchtime discussion, she will present some of the current work that she is doing on Boccaccio’s De casibus virorum illustrium (On the Fates of Illustrious Men [1360-73]).

Refreshments will be served. All are welcome!

Brown Bag Lunch: Andrew Hicks, “Listening to Fragments: Editing a ‘New’ Fourteenth-Century Motet”

Andrew Hicks [Music] will discuss Beatius/Cum humanum at noon next Wednesday, February 10, in Uris G88.

Beatius/Cum humanum is an imperfect motet, and it performs its imperfections in myriad ways. On the most basic material level it survives imperfectly, lacking its tenor (or more) in all three surviving sources. These sources, moreover, are philologically imperfect, witnessing substantial but not insoluble textual corruptions in several key verses. Such (accidental) material and philological imperfections, however, almost ruefully befit a motet that intentionally centers upon the fraught relationship between the apparent perfection of rule-bound discipline and the realities of musical and theological imperfection.

Refreshments will be served. All are welcome!

The Medieval Brown Bag Lunch Series: Spring 2016

Announcing the return of the Brown Bag Lunch series, a monthly gathering where faculty in the Medieval Studies field discuss work in progress and current research topics. Talks will be held at noon on the second Wednesday of each month, beginning next Wednesday, February 10. All are welcome!

Feb 10 | noon, Uris G88
Andrew Hicks [Music]
, “Listening to Fragments: Editing a ‘New’ Fourteenth-Century Motet”

Mar 9 | noon, room t.b.a.
Marilyn Migiel [Romance Studies], “Reading Misogyny: Boccaccio ‘Against’ Women?”  

Apr 13 | noon, room t.b.a.
Cynthia Robinson [History of Art], “Nasrid Visual Culture: Metaphor, Symbol, and Illumination”  

Ali Houissa presents “Islamic Manuscripts,” November 19

koran
Join us for a presentation by Ali Houissa, Middle East and Islamic Studies Librarian / Bibliographer at Cornell University Library.  The presentation takes place on Thursday, November 19, from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. in the Carl A. Kroch Library, room 2B48.

Between the 6th and the 17th centuries, Muslims developed a rich manuscript tradition that is reflected not only in Islamic calligraphy, illuminations and painting, but also in the artisanal crafts of penmanship and calligraphy, illumination, miniature painting and papermaking. In addition to the history of the Islamic manuscript, the talk will address topics of current interest such as aniconism versus figural representation, and the preservation of manuscript collections in conflict zones. Illuminated and illustrated rare manuscripts from Cornell’s collection of sacred, devotional and non-religious texts will be on display.

This event is cosponsored by Medieval Studies and Cornell University Library.

For more information, contact rareref@cornell.edu or call (607) 255-3530.

Laurent Ferri Presents “The Proud Symbolism of Medieval Heraldry: Why It Matters; Why It Is Fun!”

Cutting on vellum from the Great Choir Book of Ferdinand and Isabella, Castile, ca. 1479-92 Cornell University Library, Division of Rare Books and Manuscripts, #6532 Map Case Folder 8 (New Acquisition)
Join us for a presentation by Laurent Ferri, curator of pre-1800 collections in the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, adjunct associate professor of comparative literature, and member of the graduate field in the Department of Medieval Studies.  The presentation takes place on Thursday, September 24, from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. in the Carl A. Kroch Library, room 2B48.

Rare and beautiful materials from the Cornell’s collections will be on display. They document the importance of heraldry to study wars, tournaments, family dynamics and structures, or social identification and control, but also—and perhaps, more unexpectedly—art patronage, cartography, finance, and even pharmacopoeia in Europe from c. 1150-1550, with particular emphasis on the following regions: England, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, and Spain.

This event is cosponsored by Medieval Studies and Cornell University Library.

For more information, contact rareref@cornell.edu or call (607) 255-3530.

image: Cutting on vellum from the Great Choir Book of Ferdinand and Isabella, Castile, ca. 1479-92. Cornell University Library, Division of Rare Books and Manuscripts, #6532 Map Case Folder 8 (New Acquisition)

The Medieval Brown Bag Lunch Series

Announcing the Brown Bag Lunch series, a monthly gathering where faculty in the Medieval Studies field discuss work in progress and current research topics. Talks will be held at noon on the second Thursday of each month, beginning next Thursday, September 10. All are welcome!

Sep 10 | noon, Goldwin Smith 181
David Powers [Near Eastern Studies]
, “Radio-Carbon Analysis and dating early Qur’an manuscripts”

Oct 8 | noon, McGraw Hall rm. 215
Ben Anderson [History of Art], “Byzantine Oracle Books”  

Nov 12 | noon, McGraw Hall rm. 215
Simone Pinet [Romance Languages], “Iberian Coins and Metaphor”  

 

 

The Medieval Roundtable – “A Moveable Feast: Eels and Spatial Construction in 17th-Century England,” September 4

In the first discussion in the monthly “Medieval Roundtable” series, John Wyatt Greenlee will discuss his paper, “A Moveable Feast: Eels and Spatial Construction in 17th-Century England.”

Starting in 1600, maps of the city of London began to include the addition of two Dutch eel ships, floating in the river, near Queenhythe.  The ships, called schuyts, are often labeled – a key and curious feature given that the maps on which they appear otherwise only attach labels to villages, neighborhoods, and immobile urban monuments such as St. Paul’s Cathedral.  The ships’ presence on the maps mirrored the growing presence of the Dutch eel men in London:  over the course of the 17th century the Dutch became a fixture of London’s urban landscape, carving out a permanent economic and political space in the heart of England’s capital.  Curiously, the eel men owed that space to changing English conceptions of national space and identity – in fine, the establishment of the Dutch space in London came about in no small part because of English efforts to drain the Fens of East Anglia, and to create more England in the midst of the wastelands’ waters.

The discussion will be held in the English Lounge, 258 Goldwin Smith Hall, from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. on Friday, September 4. All are welcome!

The Medieval Roundtable: A Monthly Series of Graduate Presentations

The Ph.D. students in Medieval Studies begin a series of monthly work-in-progress discussions. These will be held on the first Friday of the month, from 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. All are welcome! This semester’s schedule is as follows:

Sep 4 | 2:30 p.m., Goldwin Smith 258
John
Wyatt Greenlee, “A Moveable Feast: Eels and Spatial Construction in 17th Century England”

Nov 6 | 2:30 p.m., Olin Library rm. 703
Rae Grabowski, “Rumination and Digestion: The Body of Christ and the Word”  

Dec 4 | 2:30 p.m., Olin Library rm. 703
Anna Waymack, “Maximianus and Chaucer’s Reeve”