Included in Burr’s surviving papers are five dissertations written by his students. One dissertation, “Report on Cistercian Daemonology,” was submitted on June 10, 1916 by Bertram F. Willcox, who later became Professor at the Cornell Law School. Another dissertation, “The Relations of the English Benedictine Monasteries to the Papacy in the 13th Century,” was submitted in 1917 by Alfred H. Sweet, who was appointed Professor of English History at Cornell in 1918.

Some of Burr’s students were women, and he frequently ate dinner at the women’s dining hall to demonstrate his support for female education. He was erudite and well liked:

“Everybody loved Burr, a bit elfin, true, but the most learned man I ever knew and one of the most endearing” (letter from Morris Bishop to Willem van Loon, 24 August 1965, Cornell Library).

“The Relations of the English Benedictine Monasteries to the Papacy in the 13th Century,” dissertation submitted in 1917 by Alfred H. Sweet
Cornell University Library, Division of Rare Books and Manuscripts,
George Lincoln Burr Papers, 14-17-22, box 2