Tag Archives: book

Matthew Giancarlo to deliver workshop and lecture, November 6-7

Matthew Giancarlo (Associate Professor, Engish, University of Kentucky) will host a workshop to discuss his article forthcoming in Exemplaria: “Mirror, Mirror: Princely Hermeneutics, Practical Constitutionalism, and the Genres of the English Fürstenspiegel,” in Olin Library rm. 403 at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, November 6.

He will also give a talk, entitled “Constituting Medievalism?: Historicist Literary Inquiry and the Pitfalls of Narrative,” at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, November 7, in Goldwin Smith 142.

Selected Publications:
“Chaucer and Contemporary Courts of Law and Politics: House, Law, Game.” Chapter in The Oxford Handbook of Chaucer. Forthcoming from Oxford University Press.
“Political Forms and Institutions in Piers Plowman.” Chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Piers Plowman. Cambridge University Press, 2014.
“Dressing up a ‘galaunt’: Traditional Piety and Fashionable Politics in Peter Idley’s ‘translacions’ of Mannyng and Lydgate.” In After Arundel: Religious Writing in Fifteenth-Century England.  Brepols, 2012.
“Troubling the New Constitutionalism: Politics, Penitence, and the Dilemma of Dread in the Digby Poems,” Journal of English and Germanic Philology 110 (2011).
Parliament and Literature in Late Medieval England. Cambridge University Press, 2007.
Other articles and reviews in journals such as Speculum, ELH: English Literary History, Representations, Studies in the Age of Chaucer, The Medieval Review, The Yearbook of Langland Studies, Modern Language Quarterly, and University of Toronto Quarterly.

Cynthia Robinson’s “Imagining the Passion in Multiconfessional Castile” reviewed in “Marginalia”

“Imagining the Passion in Multiconfessional Castile contains a wealth of information, detail, and insight, as well as abundant and beautiful illustrations,” writes Barbara Mujica. “Robinson brings to light countless unpublished and unknown texts and images and elucidates many understudied works. This volume not only alters our understanding of medieval Castilian devotional practices but also helps to bridge the gap between the Spanish Middle Ages and sixteenth-century mysticism, especially that of Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross, and Luis de León.” Read more here.

Cynthia Robinson publishes “Imagining the Passion in a Multi-Confessional Castile”

Cynthia Robinson (History of Art) reveals the interrelation of late medieval Iberian religious practices and culture among coexisting sects in her new book, “Imagining the Passion in a Multi-Confessional Castile: The Virgin, Christ, Devotions, and Images in the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Centuries.”

Through an examination of devotional culture in the Castile region of Iberia up to the mid-15th century, Robinson finds that the “personalized” imagery narrating Christ’s passion, then prevalent in religious art across western Europe, was not a major influence for Castilian followers’ individual relationships to Christ.

Read more here.