Tag Archives: lecture

Laurent Ferri Lecture: The Proud Symbolism of Heraldry: Why It Matters; Why It is Fun!

A presentation by Laurent Ferri, curator of pre-1800 collections in the Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, adjunct associate professor of Comparative Literature, and member of the graduate field in the Department of Medieval Studies. Lecture date: September 24, 2015. More information here.

Michel Zink, “Women’s Songs / Men’s Songs in Medieval Europe”

On Apmichel zinkril 13 (Wednesday) at 4:30PM, Prof. MICHEL ZINK will deliver a lecture at the A.D. White House (Guerlac Room) titled, “Women’s Songs/Men’s Songs in Medieval Europe”

Michel Zink holds the chair in “Littératures de la France médiévale” at the Collège de France, which goes back to the illustrious tradition of the chair of “Langue et littérature françaises du Moyen Âge” founded in 1853 for Paulin Paris. Before 1994 he was a professor of medieval French literature at the Sorbonne (1968-70, 1972-76, and 1987-94), at the University of Tunis (1970-72), and at the University of Toulouse (1976-87). He has also been a Visiting Professor at the University of Constance, the Johns Hopkins University, Berkeley, and Yale. In 2007 he received the International Balzan Prize “for his fundamental contributions to the understanding of French and Occitan literature in the Middle Ages, a decisive chapter in the development of modern European literature; for his new interpretation of the relation between medieval and modern literature; and for his seminal initiatives that have brought the literature of the Middle Ages back into the cultural tradition of France and Europe.”

More about him:

http://www.college-de-france.fr/site/en-michel-zink/index.htm

This event is co-organized by the French Studies Program  co-sponsored by and the Medieval Studies Program, the Department of Romance Studies, and the Society for the Humanities.

Simon Doubleday, “The Wise King’s Nightmare” [April 7]

Hispanic Studies invites you to “The Wise King’s Nightmare,” a lecture by Simon Doubleday (Hofstra University), Thursday, April 7, 4:30 p.m., Klarman Hall room KG42. Reception to follow.

Doubleday is Professor and Chair of the Department of History at Hofstra University, founder and editor-in-chief of the Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies, president of the American Academy of Research Historians of Medieval Spain, and author of The Wise King: A Christian Prince, Muslim Spain and the Birth of the Renaissance (Basic Books, 2015).

For more information contact Simone Pinet at simone.pinet@cornell.edu.

This event is co-sponsored by the Department of Romance Studies and the Medieval Studies Program.

Quodlibet Lecture, March 21, featuring David Freidenreich [Colby College]

Quodlibet will sponsor the visit of David Freidenreich [Colby College], who will deliver a lecture on Monday, March 21 at 4:30pm in White Hall room 110: “”Food and Identity in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.”

Refusing to share a meal or accept food prepared by others does more than just express the notion that ‘We’ want nothing to do with ‘Them.’ This kind of anti-social behavior also reinforces ideas about who They are and, perhaps more importantly, who We are. Join us to explore the evolution of Jewish food laws and the ideas they convey about Jewishness. We’ll also examine the role food restrictions play in shaping Christian and Islamic identity, and we’ll consider the ways in which traditional ideas about Us and Them continue to shape interfaith relations today.”

David M. Freidenreich is the Pulver Family Associate Professor of Jewish Studies at Colby College, where he serves as director of the Jewish studies program and associate director of the Center for Small Town Jewish Life.  As a member of the religious studies department, he teaches a wide range of courses on Judaism, Jewish history, and comparative religion.  After receiving a B.A. from Brandeis University, he earned his Ph.D. at Columbia University and rabbinic ordination from the Jewish Theological Seminary. His award-winning first book, Foreigners and Their Food: Constructing Otherness in Jewish, Christian, and Islamic Law, explores attitudes toward adherents of foreign religions expressed in ancient and medieval laws about sharing food. He is currently studying the ways Christians have used ideas about Jews to think about Muslims.

[Also, from the Department of Near Eastern Studies:]

“Freidenreich will also be giving a lecture entitled ‘Christian Portrayals of Muhammad’s Jewish Associates’ on March 21st from 12:10-1:10pm in 410 White Hall. Lunch will be provided. If there is significant interest in this lecture, it may be necessary to change the room location to 110 White Hall. 410 is our lounge and we’ve got somewhat limited seating, perhaps enough for 25 people.”

If interested in this noontime lecture, please contact Ayla Cline at akc52@cornell.edu.

‘Unfashionable Creatures’: Tolkien’s 1931 Curricular Reform and the Fantastic Imagination

Dr. Maria Sachiko Cecire (Assistant Professor; Director, Experimental Humanities, Bard College) presents “‘Unfashionable Creatures’: Tolkien’s 1931 Curricular Reform and the Fantastic Imagination,” a lecture co-sponsored by Quodlibet and the Medieval Studies program, Friday, April 10 at 4pm in Goldwin Smith Hall G22. A reception follows; this event is open to the public.

Dr. Cecire’s areas of specialization include children’s literature and culture, medieval literature and its reception, media studies, and gender studies. Publications include the coedited volumeSpace and Place in Children’s Literature (Ashgate, 2015), and articles and essays in Medieval English Theatre, Shakespeare Bulletin, The Disney Middle Ages, Anglo-Saxon Culture and the Modern Imagination, Arthurian Literature, The Journal of Children’s Literature Studies, and Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism.

Matthew Giancarlo to deliver workshop and lecture, November 6-7

Matthew Giancarlo (Associate Professor, Engish, University of Kentucky) will host a workshop to discuss his article forthcoming in Exemplaria: “Mirror, Mirror: Princely Hermeneutics, Practical Constitutionalism, and the Genres of the English Fürstenspiegel,” in Olin Library rm. 403 at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, November 6.

He will also give a talk, entitled “Constituting Medievalism?: Historicist Literary Inquiry and the Pitfalls of Narrative,” at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, November 7, in Goldwin Smith 142.

Selected Publications:
“Chaucer and Contemporary Courts of Law and Politics: House, Law, Game.” Chapter in The Oxford Handbook of Chaucer. Forthcoming from Oxford University Press.
“Political Forms and Institutions in Piers Plowman.” Chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Piers Plowman. Cambridge University Press, 2014.
“Dressing up a ‘galaunt’: Traditional Piety and Fashionable Politics in Peter Idley’s ‘translacions’ of Mannyng and Lydgate.” In After Arundel: Religious Writing in Fifteenth-Century England.  Brepols, 2012.
“Troubling the New Constitutionalism: Politics, Penitence, and the Dilemma of Dread in the Digby Poems,” Journal of English and Germanic Philology 110 (2011).
Parliament and Literature in Late Medieval England. Cambridge University Press, 2007.
Other articles and reviews in journals such as Speculum, ELH: English Literary History, Representations, Studies in the Age of Chaucer, The Medieval Review, The Yearbook of Langland Studies, Modern Language Quarterly, and University of Toronto Quarterly.

Carol Symes to present lecture and workshop, November 11-12

Carol Symes (Professor of History and Medieval Studies, University of Illinois) will deliver a lecture on Tuesday, November 11th, at 4:30 p.m. in the Guerlac Room of the AD White House, entitled “Performative Texts, Embodied Literacies, and the Documentary Revolution of Medieval Europe.”

On Wednesday, November 12th, from 10 to 11 a.m. in the English Lounge (258 Goldwin Smith Hall), Professor Symes has agreed to host a workshop for interested faculty and graduate students.  Participants will read, discuss, and comment on a pre-circulated chapter from her current book project.

Scott Gwara Lecture and Roundtable: “Medieval Meets Digital,” Thursday, October 16, 4:30 p.m.

“Medieval Meets Digital: the Manuscriptlink Project and the Cornell Manuscripts”:

Scott Gwara (Univ. of South Carolina)will present a lecture, “Manuscript Fragmentology: Restoring a Medieval Library Online, Page by Page,” in the Kroch Library (Olin), Rare Lecture Room 2B48.

Panelists include Prof. in MS Andrew Galloway, Prof. in MS Andrew Hicks, PhD candidate in MS Ruth Mullett, and digital expert Anne Sauer.

The event is sponsored by the Medieval Studies Program, the French Studies Program, the Cornell library, and the Society for the Humanities.

Benjamin Anderson, Andrew Hicks, and Courtney Roby Launch Medieval Cosmology Collaboration

The arrival at Cornell of three medieval cosmology scholars in the last three years has created a rare density of expertise in the topic, and they have launched a collaboration to take a closer, interdisciplinary look at complex cosmologies and the medieval reception of ancient science. Read more here.

Judith Peraino delivers lecture at Rock and Roll Hall of Fame

Professor of music Judith Peraino has been invited to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame April 20 to talk about her course, The History of Rock Music, as part of the Experience Music Project Pop Conference.

Peraino’s course “examines the development and cultural significance of rock music from its origins in blues, gospel and Tin Pan Alley up to alternative rock and hip hop. The course concludes with the year 2000.”

Read more here.