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MEDVL 1101 : FWS: Aspects of Medieval Culture
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
MEDVL 1101 : FWS: Aspects of Medieval Culture
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
MEDVL 1104 : FWS: Modernity and the Middle Ages
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
MEDVL 1740 : Imperial China
Crosslisted as: ASIAN 1174, CAPS 1740, HIST 1740 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the history of imperial China between the 3rd century b.c.e. and the 16th century c.e. with a focus on the following questions:  How did imperial Chinese states go about politically unifying diverse peoples over vast spaces?  How did imperial Chinese approaches to governance and to relations with the outer world compare with strategies employed by other historical empires?  How did those approaches change over time?  How did major socio-cultural formations — including literary canons; religious and familial lineages; marketing networks; and popular book and theatrical cultures — grow and take root, and what were the broader ramifications of those developments?  How did such basic configurations of human difference as Chinese (civilized)-barbarian identity, high-low status, and male-female gender operate and change over time?
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MEDVL 2100 : Medieval Romance: Voyage to the Otherworld
Crosslisted as: ENGL 2100 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Romances were, essentially, medieval science fiction and fantasy writing. They were how authors in the Middle Ages imagined things beyond rational understanding that, at the same time, greatly extended the possibilities of the world around them.  The course will survey some medieval narratives concerned with representative voyages to the otherworld or with the impinging of the otherworld upon ordinary experience. The syllabus will normally include some representative Old Irish otherworld literature:  selections from The Mabinogion; selections from the Lays of Marie de France; Chretian de Troye's Erec, Yvain, and Lancelot; and the Middle English Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.  We will finish by looking at a few contemporary otherworld romances, such as selections from J.R.R. Tolkein. All readings will be in modern English.
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MEDVL 2130 : Cultures of the Middle Ages
Crosslisted as: HIST 2742 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
It's bad enough to run up against a border: at least you know where you stand. The frontier, however -- that fuzzy, murky zone that envelops the border while making its precise contours invisible -- is far more ambiguous, dangerous ground to tread. People, ideas, and other contraband criss-cross it; men (and sometimes women) make their own law; cultures clash and conspire together. At the margins of Europe -- Ireland, Wales, Scandinavia, Poland, Germany, the Low Countries, Spain, Sicily, the Levant -- medieval people discovered what every Trekkie knows: final frontiers, spaces of both oppression and opportunity. This course will explore some of the exchanges, friendly and otherwise, that took place at the edges of the medieval world, seeding many of the most radical developments which shaped the modern world.
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MEDVL 2170 : Early Modern Iberian Survey
Crosslisted as: LATA 2170, SPAN 2170 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course explores major texts and themes of the Hispanic tradition from the 11th to the 17th centuries. We will examine general questions on literary analysis and the relationship between literature and history around certain events, such as medieval multicultural Iberia, the creation of the Spanish Inquisition in the 15th century and the expulsion of the Jews in 1492; the encounter between the Old and the New Worlds; the 'opposition' of high and low in popular culture, and of the secular and the sacred in poetry and prose. Readings may be drawn from medieval short stories and miracle collections; chivalric romances, Columbus, Lazarillo de Tormes, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Calderón, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, among others.
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MEDVL 2170 : Early Modern Iberian Survey
Crosslisted as: LATA 2170, SPAN 2170 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores major texts and themes of the Hispanic tradition from the 11th to the 17th centuries. We will examine general questions on literary analysis and the relationship between literature and history around certain events, such as medieval multicultural Iberia, the creation of the Spanish Inquisition in the 15th century and the expulsion of the Jews in 1492; the encounter between the Old and the New Worlds; the 'opposition' of high and low in popular culture, and of the secular and the sacred in poetry and prose. Readings may be drawn from medieval short stories and miracle collections; chivalric romances, Columbus, Lazarillo de Tormes, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Calderón, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, among others.
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MEDVL 2350 : The Medieval Book: Objects and Texts
Crosslisted as: FREN 2350, ITAL 2350 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The course provides a survey of the book from ca. 1100 to 1500, with emphasis on the development of the book in Western Europe, especially France, Germany, Italy, the Low Countries, and Spain.  It focuses on the many roles of the book in medieval societies, with special attention paid to production, dissemination, and reading practices. The collection of manuscripts and incunabula in Kroch Library allows a "hands-on" approach to learning.  Along the way, we will read excerpts from some of the most influential texts of the Middle Ages, such as the Song of the Nibelungs: The Romance of Alexander; the Scvias of St. Hildegard of Bingen: Dante's Divine Comedy; Jacobus de Varagine's Golden Legend; and the travel narratives of Marco Polo or Bernhard von Breydenbach.
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MEDVL 2642 : The Art of Math: Mathematical Traditions of Symmetry and Harmony
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2642, MUSIC 2642 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Symmetry and harmony are central aesthetic concepts built on a long history of mathematical exploration, not just in the European mathematical tradition but also in mathematical texts from China, India, and the Islamic world. This course will cover theoretical proofs and practical applications from geometrical, harmonic, and astronomical traditions ranging from ancient Greek geometry to early modern science. Topics include geometrical proofs, calculating systems, astronomical models, ratios and proportions, and scales and temperaments.
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MEDVL 2655 : Introduction to Islamic Civilization
Crosslisted as: HIST 2530, NES 2655, RELST 2655 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
At the beginning of the 7th century, a new religion, Islam, appeared in Arabia and by the end of the century, Muslims had defeated the Byzantines and Persians and created an empire that stretched from Spain to India. For the next millennium, Islam glittered. Its caliphs, courts, and capitals were grander, more powerful, and more sophisticated than those of any medieval king, duke or prince. In this course, we will trace the emergence and development of Islamic civilization from the birth of Muhammad ca. 570 to the Mongol sack of Baghdad in 1258. We will read the Qur'an and listen to its recitation; examine the career of the Prophet Muhammad; follow the course of the Arab conquests; explore the nature of the conflict between Sunnis and Shi'is; learn about the five pillars of Islam, sharia law, theology, and Sufism; and assess the achievements of Muslim intellectuals in literature, art, architecture, science, and philosophy.
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MEDVL 2695 : Introduction to Christian History
Crosslisted as: CLASS 2636, NES 2695, RELST 2695 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course offers an introduction to the history of Christianity from the first century through the seventeenth and perhaps a bit beyond. Our emphasis will be on the diversity of Christian traditions, beliefs, and practices throughout history. We will explore the origins of Christianity within the eastern Mediterranean world, the spread of Christianity, the development of ecclesiastical institutions, the rise and establishment of monasticism, and the various controversies that occupied the church throughout its history. Throughout the course, we will supplement our reading of primary texts with art, archaeology, music, and manuscripts.
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MEDVL 3080 : Icelandic Family Sagas
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3080 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to Old Norse-Icelandic mythology and the Icelandic family saga-the "native" heroic literary genre of Icelandic tradition. Texts will vary but will normally include the Prose Edda, the Poetic Edda, Hrafnkels Saga, Njals Saga, Laxdaela Saga, and Grettirs Saga. All readings will be in translation.
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MEDVL 3110 : Old English
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3110, ENGL 6110, MEDVL 6110 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this course, we will read and discuss some of the earliest surviving English poetry and prose. Attention will be paid to (1) learning to read the language in which this literature is written, (2) evaluating the poetry as poetry: its form, structure, style, and varieties of meaning, and (3) seeing what can be learned about the culture of Anglo-Saxon England and about the early Germanic world in general, from an examination of the Old English literary records. We will begin by reading some easy prose and will go on to consider some more challenging heroic, elegiac, and devotional poetry, including an excerpt from the masterpiece Beowulf. The course may also be used as preparation for the sequence ENGL 3120/ENGL 6120.
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MEDVL 3120 : Beowulf
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3120, ENGL 6120, MEDVL 6120 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
In recent years, Beowulf has received renewed attention in popular culture, thanks to the production of two recent Beowulf movies and riveting new translations (eg. Seamus Heaney). The poem's appeal lies in the complex depictions of its monsters, accounts of heroic bravery, and lavish portrayals of life in the Meadhall. Through close readings we will also explore the "dark side" of the poem: its punishing depictions of loss and exile, despairing meditations on unstable kingship and dynastic failure, and harrowing depictions of heroic defeat and the vanities of existence on the Middle-Earth. Attention to the poem's literary heritage (in Latin and Norse) and its layered pagan and Christian perspectives reveals an amalgamated Christian heroic ethos. [Readings in Old or Modern English]
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MEDVL 3210 : Medieval Philosophy
Crosslisted as: PHIL 3210, RELST 3150 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
A selective survey of Western philosophical thought from the fourth to the 14th century. Topics include the problem of universals, the theory of knowledge and truth, the nature of free choice and practical reasoning, and philosophical theology. Readings (in translation) include Augustine, Boethius, Anselm, Abelard, Aquinas, Scotus, and Ockham. Some attention will be given to the development of ideas across the period and the influence of non-Western traditions on the West.
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MEDVL 3315 : Old Norse I
Crosslisted as: LING 3315 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Old Norse is a collective term for the earliest North Germanic literary languages: Old Icelandic, Old Norwegian, Old Danish, and Old Swedish. The richly documented Old Icelandic is the center of attention, and the purpose is twofold: the students gain knowledge of an ancient North Germanic language, important from a linguistic point of view, and gain access to the medieval Icelandic (and Scandinavian) literature. The structure of Old Norse (Old Icelandic), phonology, and morphology, with reading of selections from the Prose-Edda, a 13th-century narrative based on the Eddaic poetry. 
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MEDVL 3316 : Old Norse II
Crosslisted as: LING 3316 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Old Norse is a collective term for the earliest North Germanic literary languages: Old Icelandic, Old Norwegian, Old Danish, and Old Swedish. The richly documented Old Icelandic is the center of attention, and the purpose is twofold: the students gain knowledge of an ancient North Germanic language, important from a linguistic point of view, and gain access to the medieval Icelandic (and Scandinavian) literature.  Extensive reading of Old Norse texts, among them selections from some of the major Icelandic family sagas: Njals saga, Grettis saga, and Egils saga, as well as the whole Hrafnkels saga.
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MEDVL 3750 : Introduction to Dendrochronology
Crosslisted as: ARKEO 3090, ARKEO 6755, ARTH 3250, CLASS 3750, CLASS 6755 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introduction and training in dendrochronology and its application to archaeology, art history, and environment through participation in a research project dating ancient to modern tree-ring samples especially from the Mediterranean. Supervised reading and laboratory/project work. A possibility exists for summer fieldwork in the Mediterranean.
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MEDVL 4002 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: LATIN 7262, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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MEDVL 4002 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: LATIN 7262, MEDVL 6020, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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MEDVL 4103 : Survey of Medieval Latin Literature
Crosslisted as: LATIN 4213, LATIN 7213, MEDVL 6103 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The Survey is designed to introduce students to characteristic genres and discourses of Medieval Latin. The focus will be on style (the genera dicendi), and its implications for audience and genre, from its foundations in classical rhetoric through Petrarch and Boccaccio. A basic foundation in Latin morphology, syntax, and vocabulary is assumed. Intermediate and advanced topics in post-Classical idioms and syntax will be treated as they arise, with the goal of improving the facility with which students approach, read, and, especially, understand Latin writings from the Middle Ages. Students in doubt about their readiness for this course should consult with the instructor.
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MEDVL 4145 : Race and Gender in the Middle Ages
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4145, ENGL 6145, FGSS 4145, MEDVL 6145 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
If "the past is a foreign country," is it a country full of oppressed women? We can, with some smugness, agree that it may have been dreadful to be a woman or sexual minority in the Middle Ages, but it's nowhere near that simple. Also un-simple are medieval notions of race. Scholars long assumed that the European Middle Ages were entirely white and/or that since "race" as a concept hadn't been invented yet, it wasn't an issue. But both racial and gender difference matter tremendously, then as now. Together, we will think about race and gender as imagined at a time before the world we now know came into being, asking what the pre-history of difference might have to do with us and our future.
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MEDVL 4180 : The Imaginary Jew: Roots of Antisemitism in Medieval England
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4180, ENGL 6180, JWST 4180, JWST 6180, MEDVL 6180 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
When did anti-Semitism begin? The medieval period invented shocking fictions about Jews—that they killed and ate Christian babies; that they desecrated the Host; that they were the murderers of Christ. In manuscripts Jews were visually compared to beasts, devils, and perverts. By law, Jews were forced to live in ghettos, wear distinctive dress, abstain from certain professions, and suffer exile. Beginning with Shakespeare's Shylock, we will work our way back through visual and literary treatments of Jews in the Middle Ages, reading texts by Chaucer, chronicles, miracle stories, crusader romances, and mystery plays. Drawing on recent theories of the other we will also consider how medieval representations of Jews and other minorities were used to construct medieval communal, religious, and political identities.
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MEDVL 4295 : Introduction to Medieval German Literature
Crosslisted as: GERST 4285, GERST 6285 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This course introduces the canon of medieval German literature: lyric poetry (Minnesang), Arthurian romance (Gottfried's Tristan, Wolfram's Parzival, Hartmann's Iwein), and the heroic epic (Nibelungenlied). With a focus on twelfth-century courtly culture, we will investigate medieval problems of form, genre, and representation, as well as post-medieval approaches to materiality, hermeneutics, and textuality. Our larger questions, centering on the controversial concept of medieval alterity, will address the contested legacy of the Middle Ages in German modernity.
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MEDVL 4420 : Tang Poetry: Themes and Contexts
Crosslisted as: CAPS 4420, CHLIT 4420 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Through guided readings in Chinese of selected poems of the Tang dynasty (618-907) on various themes and in different styles, students develop the essential analytical skills for reading Tang poetry while gaining an understanding of its social, cultural, and historical contexts.
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MEDVL 4626 : Reinventing Biblical Narrative
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4626, CLASS 7626, JWST 4626, MEDVL 6626, NES 4626, NES 6626, RELST 4626, RELST 6626 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Narratives, particularly sacred narratives, are not static or fixed but rather infinitely flexible and malleable.   Subject to multiple retellings—elaborations, modifications, and deletions—stories take on lives of their own even after they come to be written down. What happens to sacred stories when they are heard and read by different communities of interpreters? This is the broad question at the heart of this course, which will explore the diverse interpretations of biblical narratives (e.g., stories of Adam and Eve, Abraham, Moses, Jesus and his disciples, Joseph and Mary) found in Jewish and Christian literature from the second century BCE through the 6th century and beyond.  Writers like the Hellenistic Jewish philosopher Philo and the Jewish historian Josephus, Jewish and Christian pseudepigrapha and apocrypha, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the New Testament, gnostic literature, early rabbinic literature, and Christian patristic writers—these are some of the sources that we will study in this class.    At the conclusion of the seminar, we will explore briefly the retellings of biblical stories and use of biblical characters in the early Islamic materials, especially the Qur'an.    Throughout the semester, we will consider the historical contexts of biblical interpretation and the production, transmission, and use of texts in antiquity, including questions about literacy and orality, education, and the physical forms of ancient books.
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MEDVL 4632 : Emperors, Kings, and Warlords: Political Legitimacy at the End of the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4602, HIST 4632, HIST 6632, MEDVL 6632, SHUM 4632, SHUM 6632 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This seminar will analyze the transition between the late Roman empire and the barbarian kingdoms in western Europe from the perspective of how rulers, intellectuals, and common people understood legitimate and illegitimate political authority. The so-called "Dark Ages" (4th-7th centuries) were a vibrant period of creativity and reinvention. Class discussion will focus on primary source analysis, and how ethnic (Roman/Germanic), religious (Christian/non-Christian), gender, and other categories informed late antique notions of political authority. We will also discuss how notions of rulership were deployed to challenge emperors and kings. Knowledge of late antique and early medieval political ideas is crucial to understanding modern uses of the so-called "Western" past in current political debates.
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MEDVL 4761 : Anglo-Saxon England
Crosslisted as: HIST 4761, HIST 6761, MEDVL 6761 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The people who invaded the isle of Britain after the withdrawal of Roman government in the early fifth century, and who dominated it until the establishment of Norman rule in the late eleventh century, are responsible for some of the best-known and most enduring legacies of the Middle Ages: Beowulf and Bede's Ecclesiastical History, the archbishoprics of Canterbury and York, Alfred the Great and Æthelred the Unready. This course examines the Anglo-Saxons in their early-medieval context, focusing especially on the cooperation between history and its sister disciplines – archaeology, literary criticism, and others – that is so vital for shedding light on this distant, opaque era. 
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MEDVL 6020 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: LATIN 7262, MEDVL 4002, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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MEDVL 6020 : Latin Philosophical Texts
Crosslisted as: LATIN 7262, MEDVL 4002, PHIL 4002, PHIL 6020, RELST 4100, RELST 6020 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Reading and translation of Latin philosophical texts.
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Description
MEDVL 6103 : Survey of Medieval Latin Literature
Crosslisted as: LATIN 4213, LATIN 7213, MEDVL 4103 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The Survey is designed to introduce students to characteristic genres and discourses of Medieval Latin. In Fall 2012, the focus will be on style (the genera dicendi), and its implications for audience and genre, from its foundations in classical rhetoric through Petrarch and Boccaccio. A basic foundation in Latin morphology, syntax, and vocabulary is assumed. Intermediate and advanced topics in post-Classical idioms and syntax will be treated as they arise, with the goal of improving the facility with which students approach, read, and, especially, understand Latin writings from the Middle Ages. Students in doubt about their readiness for this course should consult with the instructor.
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MEDVL 6110 : Old English
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3110, ENGL 6110, MEDVL 3110 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this course, we will read and discuss some of the earliest surviving English poetry and prose. Attention will be paid to (1) learning to read the language in which this literature is written, (2) evaluating the poetry as poetry: its form, structure, style, and varieties of meaning, and (3) seeing what can be learned about the culture of Anglo-Saxon England and about the early Germanic world in general, from an examination of the Old English literary records. We will begin by reading some easy prose and will go on to consider some more challenging heroic, elegiac, and devotional poetry, including an excerpt from the masterpiece Beowulf. The course may also be used as preparation for the sequence ENGL 3120/ENGL 6120.
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MEDVL 6120 : Beowulf
Crosslisted as: ENGL 3120, ENGL 6120, MEDVL 3120 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
Beowulf has received renewed attention in popular culture, thanks to the production of recent movies and riveting new translations. The poem's popular appeal lies in its complex depictions of monsters, its accounts of heroic bravery, and its lavish portrayals of life in the Meadhall. Through close readings we will also explore the "darker side" of the poem: its punishing depictions of loss and exile, despairing meditations on unstable kingship and dynastic failure, and harrowing depictions of heroic defeat and the vanities of existence on the Middle-Earth. Attention will be given to the poem's cultural contexts, its literary heritage, and its layered pagan and Christian perspectives. A bilingual edition of the poem will be assigned so that students may read in Old and Modern English.
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MEDVL 6145 : Race and Gender in the Middle Ages
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4145, ENGL 6145, FGSS 4145, MEDVL 4145 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
If "the past is a foreign country," is it a country full of oppressed women?  We can, with some smugness, agree that it may have been dreadful to be a woman or sexual minority in the Middle Ages, but it's nowhere near that simple. Also un-simple are medieval notions of race. Scholars long assumed that the European Middle Ages were entirely white and/or that since "race" as a concept hadn't been invented yet, it wasn't an issue. But both racial and gender difference matter tremendously, then as now. Together, we will think about race and gender as imagined at a time before the world we now know came into being, asking what the pre-history of difference might have to do with us and our future.
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MEDVL 6180 : The Imaginary Jew: Roots of Antisemitism in Medieval England
Crosslisted as: ENGL 4180, ENGL 6180, JWST 4180, JWST 6180, MEDVL 4180 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
When did anti-Semitism begin? The medieval period invented shocking fictions about Jews—that they killed and ate Christian babies; that they desecrated the Host; that they were the murderers of Christ. In manuscripts Jews were visually compared to beasts, devils, and perverts. By law, Jews were forced to live in ghettos, wear distinctive dress, abstain from certain professions, and suffer exile. Beginning with Shakespeare's Shylock, we will work our way back through visual and literary treatments of Jews in the Middle Ages, reading texts by Chaucer, chronicles, miracle stories, crusader romances, and mystery plays. Drawing on recent theories of the other we will also consider how medieval representations of Jews and other minorities were used to construct medieval communal, religious, and political identities.
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MEDVL 6190 : Chaucer and Gower
Crosslisted as: ENGL 6190 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Chaucer: founder of English Literature. Gower: who that? "Friend of Chaucer"? The most famous non-famous founder of English Literature? A dull moralist, or a brilliant literary interlocutor with Chaucer? This seminar is intended to introduce both of them, or, for those who know something of them, offer opportunities to think further about them in new ways, and in either case use their known interactions to think about literary communities, literature and its social setting, and literary "debates." The seminar will not require prior knowledge of Chaucer or medieval English literature, but we will arrange an additional weekly hour or so to practice reading and understanding fourteenth-century London English. We'll also read some modern anthropological theory, some readings of sources, and a selection of critical writing.
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MEDVL 6210 : Seminar in Medieval Philosophy
Crosslisted as: PHIL 6210 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
MEDVL 6626 : Reinventing Biblical Narrative
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4626, CLASS 7626, JWST 4626, MEDVL 4626, NES 4626, NES 6626, RELST 4626, RELST 6626 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Narratives, particularly sacred narratives, are not static or fixed but rather infinitely flexible and malleable.   Subject to multiple retellings—elaborations, modifications, and deletions—stories take on lives of their own even after they come to be written down. What happens to sacred stories when they are heard and read by different communities of interpreters? This is the broad question at the heart of this course, which will explore the diverse interpretations of biblical narratives (e.g., stories of Adam and Eve, Abraham, Moses, Jesus and his disciples, Joseph and Mary) found in Jewish and Christian literature from the second century BCE through the 6th century and beyond.  Writers like the Hellenistic Jewish philosopher Philo and the Jewish historian Josephus, Jewish and Christian pseudepigrapha and apocrypha, the Dead Sea Scrolls, the New Testament, gnostic literature, early rabbinic literature, and Christian patristic writers—these are some of the sources that we will study in this class.    At the conclusion of the seminar, we will explore briefly the retellings of biblical stories and use of biblical characters in the early Islamic materials, especially the Qur'an.    Throughout the semester, we will consider the historical contexts of biblical interpretation and the production, transmission, and use of texts in antiquity, including questions about literacy and orality, education, and the physical forms of ancient books.
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MEDVL 6632 : Emperors, Kings, and Warlords: Political Legitimacy at the End of the Ancient World
Crosslisted as: CLASS 4602, HIST 4632, HIST 6632, MEDVL 4632, SHUM 4632, SHUM 6632 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
This seminar will analyze the transition between the late Roman empire and the barbarian kingdoms in western Europe from the perspective of how rulers, intellectuals, and common people understood legitimate and illegitimate political authority. The so-called "Dark Ages" (4th-7th centuries) were a vibrant period of creativity and reinvention. Class discussion will focus on primary source analysis, and how ethnic (Roman/Germanic), religious (Christian/non-Christian), gender, and other categories informed late antique notions of political authority. We will also discuss how notions of rulership were deployed to challenge emperors and kings. Knowledge of late antique and early medieval political ideas is crucial to understanding modern uses of the so-called "Western" past in current political debates.
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Description
MEDVL 6761 : Anglo-Saxon England
Crosslisted as: HIST 4761, HIST 6761, MEDVL 4761 Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor:
The people who invaded the isle of Britain after the withdrawal of Roman government in the early fifth century, and who dominated it until the establishment of Norman rule in the late eleventh century, are responsible for some of the best-known and most enduring legacies of the Middle Ages: Beowulf and Bede's Ecclesiastical History, the archbishoprics of Canterbury and York, Alfred the Great and Æthelred the Unready. This course examines the Anglo-Saxons in their early-medieval context, focusing especially on the cooperation between history and its sister disciplines – archaeology, literary criticism, and others – that is so vital for shedding light on this distant, opaque era.
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MEDVL 7777 : Medieval Studies Proseminar
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course is designed to introduce graduate students to some of the bibliography and approaches available for studying the Middle Ages.
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MEDVL 8010 : Directed Study - Individual
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
MEDVL 8010 : Directed Study - Individual
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
MEDVL 8020 : Directed Study - Group
Semester offered: Spring 2019 Instructor: Description
MEDVL 8020 : Directed Study - Group
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description